Sugar Sweet Peas and Calla Lilies (and More Cookies)

I've been busy today making sweet peas from gumpaste for my own wedding anniversary cake (to be revealed next month), and calla lilies for a five-tier wedding cake that I'm making in December.  The callas are a trial run, since I'm not yet sure what size lily is going to be best for the cake topper, and my clients are thinking that they might want the lilies to be bicolor (ivory with deep red throats), just like real two-tone Picasso calla lilies.  So, I still want to experiment with different shades of petal dust to see what effects I can create.


This was the first time I'd ever made sweet peas, and I watched Elaine MacGregor's tutorial to get a general idea (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oA2raWAxuVY). I varied mine a little, and since I don't have any sweet pea cutters, I cut the basic shapes freehand using an Xacto knife before frilling all the edges with a large dogbone tool.


In the first two photos below, you see the 'naked' sweet peas and callas, drying on their rack.  By 'naked,' I mean that the sweet peas (pale pink, purple, and blue) haven't had their final dusting of edible color yet, which is done to give them depth and dimension.  Likewise, the callas are still in their 'raw' ivory form in the second photo, and haven't received the deep-red petal dust treatment.  In the third and fourth photos here, you'll see how the sweet peas come to life once they've been dusted for color, steamed, and allowed to dry.  The fifth and sixth photos are of the white calla lilies with a little touch of green dust at the base and tip.  I'll post more pics of the calla lilies if my clients decide to go with the wine-red color for them.





All dusted and steamed:









See what a difference the petal dust makes?


I came up with a few more cookie designs recently, and I think they'd be so cute packaged as wedding or party favors. They're all shortbread cookies, topped with white chocolate fondant and various edible elements, like candy pearls and chocolate shapes made using a silicone mold.  Some are handpainted, some are shimmered with edible gold and pearl luster dusts. I love these!